Cancer Screening Services

Cancer Screening Services

Bowel Cancer Screening

Why It's Offered

Bowel cancer is a common type of cancer in both men and women.  About 1 in 20 people will get it during their lifetime.

Screening can help detect bowel cancer at an early stage, when it's easier to treat.  It can also be used to help check for and remove small growths in the bowel call polyps which can turn into cancer over time. 

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Breast Screening

Why is breast screening offered?

Most experts agree that regular breast screening is beneficial in identifying breast cancer early.

The earlier the condition is found, the better the changes of surviving it.

You're also less likely to need to have your breast removed (a mastectomy) or chemotherapy if breast cancer is detected at an early stage.

The main risk is that breast screening sometimes picks up cancers that may not have caused any symptoms or become life threatening.

You may end up having unnecessary extra tests and treatment.

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Cervical Screening

Cervical screening (as smear test) checks the health of your cervix.  The cervix is the opening to your womb from your vagina.

It's not a test for cancer, it's a test to help prevent cancer.

All women and people with a cervix aged 25 to 64 should be invited by letter.

During the screening appointment, a small sample of cells will be taken from your cervix.

The sample is checked for certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) that can cause changes to the cells of your cervix.  These are called 'high risk' types of HPV.

If these types of HPV are not found, you do not need any further tests.

If these types of HPV are found, the sample is then checked for any changes in the cells of your cervix.  These can then be treated before they get a chance to turn into cervical cancer.

You will get your results by letter, usually in about 2 weeks.  It will explain what happens next.

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